Renal Diet-Eat More Acid-Producing Foods to Control Phosphorus

When you have renal disease, your diet probably needs to change quite a bit from the way you were eating before your kidneys started having problems.

Commonly consumed foods you once liked to eat might be on your do-not-consume list now to preserve kidney function.

Why? You need to limit the amount of foods you eat that contain sodium, potassium, phosphorus, and protein.

Too much phosphorus, in particular, is a problem for people with renal disease that can lead to hardening of the arteries, increase blood pressure, and block or restrict blood flow.

And that’s a problem that can increase the risk for heart disease, heart attacks, strokes, and early death. Some studies show that elevated phosphorus levels can also reduce calcium absorption and increase the risk for bone fractures.

How do you control phosphorus levels to protect your health when you have renal disease? Your food choices can make a difference. New research suggests eating more acid-producing foods actually helps your body excrete more phosphorus.

In a recent study published in AJKD, researchers followed 980 patients with chronic kidney disease. They looked at their diets and measured phosphorus levels by testing urine samples. They found that people who ate more acid-producing foods had better results at controlling phosphorus levels, than people who did not.

Some acid-producing foods include hard processed cheese, egg yolks, meat, poultry, fish, and some grains, rice and pasta.

Need help figuring out what to eat to follow a Renal-Friendly diet? While you’ll probably need to adjust your diet to manage renal disease, there are still plenty of tasty and healthy foods you can enjoy. And it appears that you can control phosphorus levels by eating acid-producing foods found in meals like Cheese Omelet, Broccoli & Cinnamon Apples, Meatballs with Rice & Gravy, Peas & Carrots and Cauliflower, Chicken Paprika with Brown Rice and Green Beans and many others you’ll find on our Renal-Friendly menu.